Snooker Breakbuilding Tips and How To – 62 Break Explained

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Breakbuilding is crucial to your success in snooker and other cue sports. The best way to win in cue sports is to clear up all the balls. I have been working on my break building for many years and have finally started knocking in several 50+ breaks. I was at my friends last night – he has a 5’x10′ table – and I knocked in a 62 break. I have recorded my commentary and tips in the break and placed them on Youtube so can learn and get better at your snooker breakbuilding and cue ball control skill. Shot selection is crucial in snooker and I have tried to provide some ideas and tips in this break.

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8 replies
  1. Steadwick D'Penha
    Steadwick D'Penha says:

    Dear Mayur,
    This was a very interesting video explaining how to build a higher break.I have not yet seen anyone explain this method. My highest break is 44 and I have been trying for years to better this number but I seem to be getting lower that 44 breaks. But I will definitely start practicing what I have learned from your video. Keep up the good work. God Bless

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Thanks so much Steadwick. I’m really glad it helped. I’m sorry I took so long to reply to your comment. I have since improved my game. I’m not striking the cue ball nearly as hard any more. Would you like to see additional videos like this one? What area specifically would you like to me to focus on?

      Reply
  2. Kenneth Leung
    Kenneth Leung says:

    Hi, Like your video with commentary very much. Many a time it’s too quickly to figure out what the masters is thinking and doing in seeing a tournament. Thank you for the analysis of the thoughts and cue actions.

    Reply
  3. Ben
    Ben says:

    great blog, great video. this is a gem.

    i am of the firm belief that there are better potters out there than Ronnie, but in terms of decision making, and managing the table – Ronnie is the best of the best. not many compare with him.

    Yes you sir are trying to answer the question: what should be the objective of snooker? and how should that be acheived.

    my thoughts:

    (1) To score the highest with the greatest degree of probability. which requires
    (2) shooting the easiest shots with the highest probability of success, and the highest margin for error. Ronnie “misses” too. But he has a thick marign of error and he’s good enough to get the shots in, which are slightly off position.
    (3) and if one has a high chance of missing…….to minimise the damage.
    (4) to make it easier for yourself and as hard as possible for your opponent. let him make it easy for you. but we needn’t help him.

    my thoughts.

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Thanks Ben! Very kind words and I really do appreciate it! Most def there is nobody like Ronnie. Regarding point 2, in nearly every big break there is always going to be 2-3 hard shots which will make or break the run. One key thing to remember about point 4 is that “if I miss” shouldn’t be part of your thought process when you are in the short game. The long ball to get “in” is where you need to make this decision, but once that’s done, focus on making a break and staying at the table.

      Reply
  4. Snooker
    Snooker says:

    Breakbuilding is crucial to your success in snooker and other cue sports. The best way to win in cue sports is to clear up all the balls. I have been working on my break building for many years and have finally started knocking in several 50+ breaks.

    Reply