Playing Poorly? Is it your Snooker cue?

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Are you concerned your cue isn’t up to snuff?  Do you think it’s too light, too heavy, too narrow, or thick, or the wrong tip size? Read on and measure your cue up against my recommendations below.

Snooker requires a delicate, consistent, and precise acceleration of your cue. There are some basic characteristics of a good cue that I believe are a minimum requirement in playing snooker:

Cue Weight

A cue weighing between 17-19oz.  Players with more upper body mass, bigger hands and Popeye arms can probably get away with a heavier cue but I think you can’t go much more than 19oz to play the game properly.  Rumor has it that Jimmy White plays with a 21oz cue and if that’s true, it’s explains in part his inability to control the white ball precisely (although his cue action is to blame as well). If your cue weighs much more than 19oz, you will find it difficult to accelerate the cue precisely and play the controlled stuns and screws required.  Conversely, if your cue weighs anything below 17oz, you may find the opposite problem of over-accelerating your arm to get any consistent cue ball movement.  There are some instances where you can get away with a very light cue.  Some of the old vintage cues you see on Ebay weigh 15-16oz but the wood is old growth Ash and Maple that’s well seasoned and lively.

Cue Length

Cue length is a controversial one to recommend.  A few factors play a role in what length is good for you including the average distance between your bridge and cueing hand, your height (shorter people should actually have a longer cue), and how you cue (a long backstroke vs a short one).  If you tend to have long back swings, a longer cue might be beneficial. If you tend to lock out your bridge arm below vs keeping it bent (what my m8 calls the “broken wing”), then a longer cue is useful to have. I’m 5’9 and although a 57.5″ cue is typical for someone of my height, I tend to stretch my bridge hand out quite far and have a wide distance between my bridge hand cueing hand and so I feel more comfortable with a longer cue.  If you don’t know for certain and are looking to acquire a cue, start with the standard specs of 57.5″ in length. As you learn more about cueing, cue action, and body mechanics, you can get a more appropriate cue, or adjust the one you have.

Tip Size

A tip size between 9.5mm and 10.5mm.  I think right around 9.8mm is perfect.  Tip size is rather important because it determines the contact surface on the cue ball.  In snooker, 9.8mm works very well because it allows for accurate cueing at distance and enough contact surface when you are up close playing delicate stun and screw shots. If you use a tip size below 9.5mm you will find it very difficult to get any consistence on long ball potting as you will often get unintended side spin on the cue ball (and miss the pot).  Above 10.5mm is too large and it becomes hard to find the right contact point to play precise stun and screw shots.  Tip size isn’t a hard and fast rule and if you know what you are doing, experiment and try something different. I do know of at least one player locally who is a very capable century breaker that plays with a 10mm ferrule fitted with an 11mm tip!

Butt Diameter

Butt size is rather important.  If you are just starting to play snooker, go with a standard butt size of 29.5mm.  If however, you have been playing the game a while, and the basics of your cue action have become second nature (someone having played more than 6 months for example), it’s recommended that you stay with the same butt size as was on your previous cue so that your cue action isn’t dramatically affected.  If you have longer than average fingers, or above average height, than a larger butt size may be beneficial.  If the butt size is too big for your hand, your hand won’t release properly from the cue during delivery.  Generally, when cueing you are supposed to have a soft touch with your cueing hand until after the cue ball has been hit.  Think like this when cueing: soft hand feather, soft hand feather, soft hand feather, soft hand backswing, cue ball strike, grip the cue to catch it. The heaving gripping shouldn’t happen until after delivery so a comfortable butt size is important. Conversely, if the butt size is too small, you will find that your wrist starts to twist, turn, and flick.  Some wrist flick is useful to have on certain shots, but if your cue butt size is so small it’s happening on every shot, it’s not good.

Bevel or Not?

On a side note, having a bevel or champfer is something I don’t have a clear answer for. The first 5 years I played the game I used a beveled cue.  Then I stopped for a few years, acquired a few more cues and now am playing with a round butted cue.  I don’t think I would go back to a champfer or bevel now.  I actually believe the champfer could cause more problems than it solves but again, I’m not sure I have the right answer yet.  If you don’t know for certain yourself, or are just starting out and are ordering a custom made cue, have it sent without a bevel.  You can always add it later.

Shaft Taper Characteristics

How a cue shaft is tapered affects how it plays.  I think the “milk bottle” taper is how a snooker shaft should be. This is where most of the shaft is thick until the taper becomes more prominent in the last 12 or so inches up to the ferrule.  This taper provides the strength and horizontal force for long, straight cueing, and the heavier taper in the last 12 or so inches provides just enough flex to get the easy spin and soft touch when in the short game.

Cue makers tend to have a preferred taper they ship cues out with. Some cue makers base their judgement of the taper based on what they believe the wood needs in order to play.  Some like to reduce the cue ball squirt and so thin out the shaft significantly, whereas others like to leave a lot more wood on the shaft and keep the shaft stiff and rigid.

Lower end cues that use less dense Ash and Maple wood tend to ship standard with a very thick shaft. It’s done this way to provide the rigidity but at the cost of cue comfort for the user.  Older vintage cues can be made quite a bit slimmer than average as often the wood is more dense and hardened.

American pool cues come with a straight taper where the last 18-24 inches of the shaft are the same diameter.  It’s done this way because you can impart more side spin on the cue ball – which is standard practice in American pool.  American pool is a top and side spin game, whereas snooker is a screw and stun game. Different shafts are needed to play each game well.  For pool I have a Predator shaft (laminated maple, light weight, less squirt), whereas for snooker, I prefer a very dense and stiff Ash or Maple shaft and am not as concerned about squirt.

I hear players talk about how their cue is “lively” but often, it’s just the way the shaft has been tapered.  You can take a dead hitting cue, increase the shaft flex by tapering it down on a lathe or by hand, and give it a lot more “life” than it had before.

Ash vs Maple and the Shaft Wood

What’s important is the wood itself.  Good cue makers have select Ash or Maple that is well seasoned, aged, dried, and less susceptible to warping. Having straight arrows and lines is a controversial subject and it’s worth some mention. Dense shaft wood with bad arrows will generally play better and with more stiffness than young light weight wood with perfect arrows. Sometimes, lines represent the stiffer part of the tree and so a shaft with many lines can hit well but in other cases too many lines from another tree make the shaft soft and whippy which becomes hard to control and doesn’t play well at all. Don’t be too concerned about arrows or lines if you don’t have a preference or full understanding either way.  Just ask the cue maker for dense, stiff, well seasoned wood and leave it to them.  Some cue makers suggest that arrows affect sighting and won’t ship you a cue without at least some straight arrows on the top part of the playing cue.

Even if you have a first rate cue, it’s still possible the cue just isn’t right for you.  The best way to approach this dilemna, is to go and try some other cues for an extended period of time. If you are lucky enough to have a m8 with a quality cue, ask to borrow it for an hour or so on the practice table.  Please don’t “test” a cue on the match table. Your focus is different in a match situation and you don’t get the focused time as you would in practice.

Still aren’t sure?

Do you want some sage advice on your current playing cue?  Do you need some ideas on what cue you should purchase?  Check out my Snooker cue maker list or leave a comment and share your thoughts!

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44 replies
  1. Sam
    Sam says:

    Some amazingly in-depth tips here – genius.

    I was actually sold a cue by a maker who advised me NOT to have a long cue because I’m not very tall – no wonder I played terribly with it.

    Reply
    • SnookerDelight
      SnookerDelight says:

      Thanks! Choosing the right length can be a challenge. Some say it should be short enough so that it’s comfortable in your hands, but others says it’s actually better to have at LEAST the standard length so that you can reach a majority of shots. If it’s too short, then you have to use butt extensions a lot which makes the game less enjoyable.

      Reply
      • Hasnat
        Hasnat says:

        Hi, Thanks for such a wonderful article. I have a question regarding the accuracy of the pot. I have cue having 10mm tip size and weight is around 18 oz. Problem is I am having trouble with the shot accuracy. Should I decrease the tip size to 9.5/9.7 ?? or anything else going wrong.

        I am a good player of snooker but I want to polish my skills more so that I can compete is big tournaments.

        I am from Pakistan, Lahore city. please advise. Thanks

        Regards

        Reply
        • Mayur Jobanputra
          Mayur Jobanputra says:

          Hi Hasnat. Generally, 10mm is just a LITTLE BIT too large, but it’s not by much at all. I currently use 9.75mm on my cue but I’m thinking of going down to 9.5mm. It has been said that smaller tips require you to be more precise and larger tips can let you be more non-specific how you hit the cue ball. As your game improves you will want to move down from 10mm. BUT, one VERY IMPORTANT TIP: don’t change your current playing cue yet. If possible, can you get a second cue with a smaller tip size which you can play for a few months with? I would hate to see you change the tip size on your CURRENT cue, and then have regrets. Best Regards, Mayur.

          Reply
  2. Dom
    Dom says:

    A great and informative article! I was surprised however when I read that shorter people need longer cues. Could you please elaborate on the rationale behind this? I’m a short person myself and have struggled playing with longer cues (perhaps its my technique).

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Dom. Thanks for posting your comment. For snooker, one of the issues that someone shorter will face is that they can’t reach many shots. Ideally, with standard table heights, being around 5 feet 8 inches is the ideal minimum height. Of course, the length of your legs and your individual body mechanics plays an important role as well. If you were to listen to classical theory on the subject, it would suggest that your cue should be near the height of your shoulders, but this isn’t taking into account the quality of shaft, wieght of your cue, tip size, tip type etc that all play an important role in your cue performance. Having a slightly longer cue (that is balanced slightly forward towards the shaft), can be beneficial.

      Reply
    • Andy
      Andy says:

      Hi,

      I’m a short person myself 5ft1″ and the question of cue length is something I have wrestled with for many years. I started playing when I was 18 and now I am 62. Any professional player or professional coach or cue maker will tell you that the ideal tip to bridge length is about 10″. the longer this length is, the more, even the slightest movement off straight with your cueing will exaggerate your off centre striking of the cue ball and you won’t pot. Just try holding your cue with a bridge to tip length of about 18″ and then move the arm which is holding the cue from side to side a slight amount and watch how much the tip moves. Then do the reverse and hold the cue with a bridge to tip length of about 4″ and do the same. Look at the difference in the tip movement. It’s a no brainer. If you are short and use a standard length cue, the only way to achieve this all important 10″ from bridge to tip is to hold the cue much further up and then you end up with a load of the back end of the cue stuck out behind which not only looks ridiculous but the balance is all wrong too. I use a 53″ cue which for me feels perfect. Get a 3 piece and then you can screw the butt extension on for those hard to reach shots. Sure, you have to use the rest more than most people but just practice with it until your are good with it. Also be mindful about where you leave the cue ball because again being short, playing shots from one side of the table is always easier than the other depending on whether you are left or right handed. I recently started league playing again after a 15 year break and took 2 cues along to matches, my old 52″ cue and a new 57″ cue. My “knowledgeable” mates said I cued better with my longer cue but I wasn’t convinced so I enlisted the help of a professional coach and he convinced me that a shorter cue would be better for me so I had one custom made at 53″ and I am now really settled with it.

      At the end of the day it is an advantage if you are tall playing snooker but you have to make the best of what you’ve been given and I can tell you I have ruined many a 6ft player’s night with my 53″ cue.!

      Hope this helps,

      Andy.

      Reply
      • Mayur Jobanputra
        Mayur Jobanputra says:

        This is a great comment. Thanks for sharing Andy. I think my original recommendation on cue length in the article needs to be revised and re-thought. As I have stated in other articles, I don’t know everything about this game and given my height (5’9″”) I’m not in a good position to talk about cue length for shorter players.

        Reply
  3. Leo
    Leo says:

    I have a 25 year old generic Orchid 18oz snooker cue with a 9mm tip. Used to play as a teenager and recently picked up snooker again after more than 20 years. Obviously game is very weak but slowly getting consistent. My problem i think i have figured out is that the 9mm tip is way too small. I played with my new Predator P3 just to try a thicker tip and i was able to pot a few more balls than before. Finally i tested a BCE 10mm or 10.5mm cue from a gentleman at the snooker parlour and even made a couple of 25-30 point breaks.
    So now, i am currently doing some research and shopping around for a reasonably price good quality cue…..

    Does this make any sense….is there any validity to my conclusions?

    BTW, great blog and post….

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Leo. Thanks for posting your comment and thanks for the kind words! Yes, most definitely there is validity to your concerns. The standard range, if you can call it that, for tip sizes is somewhere between 9.5mm and 10mm. 9.8mm seems to the be consensus for ideal tip size with a cue length somewhere between 57 and 58 inches. Of course there are always variations like with Stephen Lee who seems to use a very small tip size, and Peter Ebdon that plays with a mushroom tip. Also, the Predator cue can be a good temporary replacement but the issue with using a Predator shaft is that you are not “punished” for using side. That is, with the Predator, you can hit the cue ball off centre, and still have the cue ball travel down the intended line of travel (but with unintended side spin). More than all the other cue sports, snooker requires the most precision based on the table size and distance balls need to travel. In American pool you can get away with sloppy potting but in snooker, the margins are much narrower. As you are shopping around and trying cues, what you want to look for is a cue that instantly speaks to you and that you are able to easily pot balls with. It needs to be stiff but not rigid with at least some “give”. It should also be well balanced. Not too heavy in the back and not too heavy in the front. Ideally, a 3/4 cue with a light weight joint (like the John Parris line) with decent shaft wood (evenly spaced arrows and no “boats” in the grain). When you first pick up the cue, potting should be a fairly effortless exercise with it at short range. I’m planning on doing a short series on cues with an accompanying video, but just haven’t had time. Feel free to get in touch directly with me if you like and I can give you further feedback. By the way, depending on your budget, I have a few cues available for sale as well and I have a friend that has a few very good cues available also.

      Reply
  4. Nasif
    Nasif says:

    Thank you for such an informative article.The basic information about the cue is really helpful and has answered a lot of my questions.Im looking forward to buying a new cue for myself and am thinking of going with a Peradon Carlisle 3/4 joint 58 inch 9.5mm Ash wood shaft,I borrowed it from a person in a local parlour and it felt really comfortable while playing.But the thing I am confused about is the weight, I couldn’t ask him about the cue’s weight.I have alws preferred playing with a heavier cue and my strengths are in stun and screw shots, now what I want to know is if I buy a cue with 18-20oz cue will it cause any damages to my natural game of playing stun and screw shots or do I go for a 17-18.5oz cue?

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      The weight of a cue alone isn’t the only factor in how a cue plays. Wood quality, tip size, and the shaft characteristics will affect how a cue plays. However, changing cue weight shouldn’t cause your game to change. Your game is your own and the way you choose to play shots should not be determined by the cue. It’s you who delivers the cue, not the other way around. I know what its like changing cues and worrying that you might need to change your game, and for a lot of players, this can be a scary time. Have a little bit of faith, don’t change your style of play. Instead, see if the cue fits YOU, rather than the other way around.

      Reply
  5. Joaquin
    Joaquin says:

    Very good article, Im from Mexico, I want to made my own snooker cue just for fun and feel what it’s look like, in Mexico no body sale snooker cues and anything about snooker. Im the only one in Mexico with a snooker ball sets and the only one who want to have an snooker cue, Im going to made it using a carom cue. I found all the information needed, butt diameter in particular. But I found more interesting information in your post, I will come back often to read more of your posts. Thanks

    Reply
  6. Will
    Will says:

    Hi Mayur,

    Thanks for your insight and the website, its really great!
    I started playing snooker from the last 6 months and I recently have purchased a cue , I am trying out different grips while playing to see which will suit to my fingers (I have little fingers). coming to the V grip or Ronnie grip where the index finger hangs little down. I am not able to perform that kind of grip maybe because of the fingers length. can you let me know what kind of grips would better suit me and let me know if i need to buy a cue with width less than 29mm in diameter to suffice the fingers? let me know if you want me to send a video.
    your comments will be highly appreciated as i am not able to move forward with my game with an improper or unstable grip. thanks for taking time to read. Cheers

    Will

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Will. One of the pro-tips I have learned is that the grip is actually the RESULT of everything else you are doing. It’s not something you should be trying to control consciously. Focus instead of delivering the cue straight, on getting your stance sorted out so that you are consistently in position, and work on things like break building, tactics and more.

      About the only thing you need to know about the grip for now is that it should be fairly loose, until after strike. The only time you really need to grip the cue is to catch it after you have struck the white ball. Some basic rules to follow is that your hand should fully hold the cue with just enough pressure to prevent the cue from slipping away. Use the same pressure as if you were holding the hands of a 5-year old. Light, but not too light. Firm, but not too firm. One of the things you can work on actively, is understanding how the grip changes during feathering. As your cue comes back (and in a straight line), the grip will naturally need to open up. Some players will tend to cock their wrist as the cue comes backwards so that they keep holding the cue. This isn’t recommended because this can induce a wrist flick during strike and that will affect the cue acceleration. Instead, keep your wrist stationary, and instead open and close the fingers during the backswing. Have a look at Ronnie OSullivan for some good examples of this grip system.

      In regards to the butt size, and your fingers, perhaps a smaller butt diameter is needed. The only way to know if its working is to try. Use videos to record your progress and to see if its helping.

      Hope that helps. Keep me updated how you progress with cue changes and working on your grip.

      Reply
  7. pappas leonidas
    pappas leonidas says:

    I am sorry if this irrelevant but i would like to ask you something. I bought a 9.5 mm snooker cue (reaaally cheap) i haven;t got it yet but i mostly play american 8 ball. Did i do a big mistake?

    Reply
  8. Rue
    Rue says:

    I am just a tad over 5’8″. I have a 12′ table that is 34.75″ in height, .25″ above regulation. It really affects my stroke. What are your suggestions to mitigate this issue?

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hmm. Only a 1/4 inch above regulation doesn’t seem that bad. I’m also 5’10” so I’m not much taller than you. I would suggest that you probably wear shoes that give you that additional height or place a thick carpet around the table. Where do you think the issue is for you?

      Reply
  9. Pranay
    Pranay says:

    Hello fellow enthusiast. Quite a detailed blog and very informative as well. Kudos on that.
    I was wondering if you could help me decide between 2 Snooker Cue sticks I have narrowed down to. The consideration is mainly because I played Snooker at clubs and parlours from 2000 – 2007. and didn’t really buy any cue stick for it. Now I’ve started playing regularly at our community club and the Cue Sticks the club is offering for general players is very light and I tried playing with them for 10-15 days. Now after your reading your blog, deciding on a budget and available options, I have narrowed it down to these 2 Cue sticks.

    1. PowerGlide Senator (Tournament Series)
    2. PowerGlide Duellist (Tournament Series)

    Both are 18 oz. and have a 9.5 mm Tip. Duellist comes with red n cream decals on the butt and the other is clean from any decals.

    Which one should I get? I can’t make up my mind. Your advice would be much appreciated.

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Pranay. I just checked both cues out. I think which you like. They both look similar in specs. They are both center-jointed and machine spliced. I would say either would be fine. Whichever you think will be best and that you will love to use and enjoy.

      Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Dave. You will have to be more precise before I can give you a useful answer. Is it a pool or snooker cue? What is the total weight now? What is your level of play? Thanks. Hope to hear back soon.

      Reply
  10. Kenneth
    Kenneth says:

    Hi, Nice to see this post. 1) I played the game better and more accurate with a tip-size of 9.0mm instead of 9.8/10mm. Especially when i need to pot in a straight or nearly straight lines. 2) I liked maple because it has no arrows and lines as in ash cues. I thought it will give me less interference in aiming. But now i don’t really think arrows and lines matter much. Maple is less sticky to bridge i should admit. Thank you for your review.

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Thanks Kenneth. I appreciate you adding in your comments. It’s actually rather rare that you get more precision with a smaller tip on straight shots. That tells me you have more awareness of where you hit the cue ball, or at the very least it’s in your peripheral vision. Thanks.

      Reply
  11. Dave Mac
    Dave Mac says:

    Hi
    I play with a 23oz ash cue 9.8mm tip i find that if i have a lighter cue i end up throwing my arm through the shot whereas now my head keeps still as i let my cues weight do it for me this does not affect me on a slow roll up shot either at the end of the day i think its just what ever you are comfortable with as snooker is 50% confidence.
    Cheers Dave Mac

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Thanks for the comment Dave. One thing that happened to me in changing cue weights from a very light cue around 17.5oz to a much heavier cue around 20oz, I found that it took me a long time to re-adjust, but I was able to do it. Whenever I go back to using a lighter cue, I find it’s actually easier to find my touch again. You are absolutely right, that confidence is half the game. So if you feel that the 23oz cue is right for you, then that’s all that matters and you will always find your center again with it.

      Reply
  12. Kenneth
    Kenneth says:

    Agreed. Since i have operations (Vitrectomy and Catact extration) on my left eye, which is the dominant eye, over recent years.

    Reply
  13. Adam Stapleton
    Adam Stapleton says:

    Have you tried the new Tricues? If so what do you think of them. By the way the spamcheck question correct answer is 155 not 147.

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Adam. Thanks for posting a comment. I haven’t tried the Tricues yet. In fact, I had never heard of such a cue until you mentioned it. After a quick chuckle, I put some thought into it, and I think it may actually be interesting to see how the cue would perform. I would definitely be interested to do a review of the cue at some point.

      Reply
  14. Fil Nicholson
    Fil Nicholson says:

    Great insights. I have been playing with a predator but now play snooker only. I am 6ft5 and like a straight bridge arm as well as having broad shoulders. I currently have to bend my bridge arm a lot or run out of room for a swing at the back. My hands are big also. Should I get a cheap cue and play with the extension always and wrap neoprene around the butt? Thanks

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Fil. Thanks for the comment. You could, as a test, play with a cheap snooker cue yes. The Predator pool cues would typically start around 12-13mm in tip size, so for that reason alone, getting a snooker cue around 10mm (I recommend 9.8mm to start) will be beneficial. If you continued playing snooker with a pool cue, you would be really missing out on some of the nuances that you would only discover playing with a proper tip size. I also suggest staying away from layered tips initially. The limitations of a pressed tip (Elkmaster or Blue Diamond) actually help in the early stages. Regarding extension and wrap, I suppose that’s possible, but that would throw the cue balance off, which again, would take away from your game. One possibility to consider is get a cue maker to build a snooker shaft for you that is 1-2 inches longer than standard. This way, you get to keep using the Predator butt (which are pretty good). This will greatly reduce the re-learning you need to make and will also help you to switch games without distraction.

      Reply
  15. John
    John says:

    Hi, I’ve never played snooker but I do love playing 8 ball on a 7ft competition size table. My older brother who’s been playing for 20 years now, tells me the best wood you can get on a pool cue that won’t hurt your wallet is Ash for the Shaft and Ebony for the 4th quarter of the cue. Is that true? If not, which wood should I be looking for in my first personal cue?
    Thanks
    PS I repeat, I don’t play snooker.

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi John. Perhaps it’s more expensive to get Maple where you are, but in America/Canada we see a lot of Maple for pool cues, and ash for snooker cues. Both ash and maple are easy to get here. One of the better local cue makers, Kevin Deroo, is world famous for his maple cue shafts. Regarding ebony for the bottom end of the cue, ebony is used to weight down the cue as its very dense and heavy. This is done to bring up the cue weight up to 18 or 19oz in total weight. With a pool cue, however, which will have a larger tip size, the shaft can account for more of the weight overall so some pool cue makers dont necessarily use ebony for the butt, and use things like Rosewood or other less dense (and less expensive) cues. If you are considering your first pool cue, I would urge you to consider the Predator cues from USA. They are regarded as the best cues to use for pool and the joint system used (uniloc) allows you to try a variety of shafts on the market as they all support this joint system universally. If Predator cues are outside of your budget, head down to the local cue store and pickup a mid-range one piece pool cue. And then as your game improves, upgrade the cue later. I don’t recommend getting an expensive cue right out the gate. Trying different cues over your playing career will help you. Each time you change cues, you are forced to re-evaluate cue action which is beneficial. Hope that helps.

      Reply
  16. Adam Reade
    Adam Reade says:

    Hi,
    I am just getting into snooker as a sport however the cues at my local hall are a little on the worn side so I am looking to buy my own. As I said I am a beginner so a cheaper cue would be ideal as would a two piece for ease of transport. What cue would you recommend I look at? I live in the UK BTW, if that changes anything.
    Thanks in advance

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Adam. Peradon makes some very good cues that aren’t ridiculously priced. If you can, you should visit a cue shop that lets you try the cues. If you can try the cue, you will be able to find a cue that fits your needs. As you are just getting into snooker, get a cue you can afford now, and then as your skills progress, you can upgrade and purchase a better cue later. A 3/4 cue is ideal, but a two piece cue is just as good. I also suggest a cue with around 9.8mm tip size. A lot of the UK cues are going to be 9.5mm tip size which I find is a little too small for a beginner. A larger tip size also allows you make the cue more narrow later if you so wish. If you are still confused, get in touch and I will try to help you.

      Reply
  17. Esmond Jules Sanchis
    Esmond Jules Sanchis says:

    Hi Mayur!
    Just the information I was looking for as regards specifications of Snooker Cues. My daughter Arantxa Sanchis is 5 ft tall. She uses a Single piece Cue which is 52 inches length, 17 Oz wt , 28 mm butt diameter and 9 mm tip size. If I give her a Cue with any other dimensions, no matter even if the difference is very small, she feels uncomfortable.
    Please let me know if 9 mm tip size is Ok for Snooker.
    Incidentally she plays both Billiards and Snooker at the International level. She is the current IBSF World Womens Billiards Champion.
    Also is 28 mm but diameter ok, considering she has small palms.
    Is wt of 17 Oz too much for a Cue as short as 52 inches.

    Col EJ Sanchis, India

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Hi Esmond. If your daughter is the current IBSF World Women’s Billiard Champion, I think she is doing things correctly! I wouldn’t be worrying so much about tip size if she is able to play the game to that level. Yes, 9mm is a little small, but perhaps not for Billiards. As a player becomes better, the tip size can be smaller. Smaller tip sizes require a more refined cue action and players at a higher level can use a smaller tip size.

      Reply
  18. Graham Reynolds
    Graham Reynolds says:

    Hiya Mayur!
    Just read your post on “cue advice” and appreciate your comments!
    You appear to be very knowledgeable about the way in which one cue differs from another depending on the weight / length and thickness of the cue!
    You also point out the importance of the tip size and go on to precisely recommend the mm of tip size of which a player should choose to use when starting out to play the game of snooker!
    In relation to your advise I could not agree more!
    However I write mainly to congratulate you on your fantastic sense of humour lol lol
    After reading your comments re: Jimmy White “this in part explains his inability to control the white ball precisely” lol lol lol
    and then (audience still in fits of laughter) you follow up with final punch line!! ALTHOUGH HIS CUE ACTION IS TO BLAME AS WELL!!!!
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL You are a brave man Mayur!! to have a dig at one of the all time great players and cueists the world of snooker have ever seen barring Ronnie Osullivan is one hell of a cheek!!
    Jimmys records speak louder than any theorists opinions my friend!!!

    Reply
    • Mayur Jobanputra
      Mayur Jobanputra says:

      Without doubt Graham. His records do stand proof of his accomplishments. It just goes to show that there is much more than technique and a good cue involved in playing this game. Expertise can be achieved over time and it’s Jimmy’s unique combination that makes him so great. It’s a shame he didn’t change over time. With a little bit of guidance he would definitely have won a world title and beaten Hendry at least a few times in the finals. To reach as many finals and still not win says something about how tough this game is.

      Reply
  19. Tony Fun
    Tony Fun says:

    Interesting points…Jimmy’s 23 professional titles definitely do speak as loud as needed. I have to say I am happy Jimmy never made changes as I love the way he plays snooker and would have rather see him finish a finalist with his game than win a world championship with someone else’s. I think when the clinical aspect of the game meets the fit of ones personality, character and natural ability then creates a great player. I also agree with Graham that the info on cue and tip size is quite good. Look forward to reading more on your site.

    Reply
      • Graham Reynolds
        Graham Reynolds says:

        Yeah my sentiments entirely Tony well said!
        I am sure everyone appreciates wether a player of reasonable standard or even a none playing viewing fan of the game that performing the levels of skill
        required to even achieve professional status within the sport is a fete within its self!
        But to have consistently produced such high standards so as to have kept oneself at the top of the sport for so long as Jimmy White did along with applying the high levels of skills required with such flamboyant flair only magnifies the undesputed genius of Jimmy White!!
        It unfortunately is a sad fact that throughout any sport there will be winners & there has to be losers!!
        And although Jimmy won his fair share of titles & more than his fair share of prize money the world crown unfortunately is the one that has eluded him!!
        Like the media & press have said on numorous occasions!!
        THE GREATEST PLAYER NEVER TO HAVE WON THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP!

        Reply